Archive for March 8th, 2013

8th March
2013
written by Adam

Before Dorothy and Toto traveled to the land of Oz, Oz himself (James Franco) had to travel to the magical land. You see, early in his career Oz was a magician in a travelling road show, unsure of himself, guarded in emotions, yet hungry for love; assisted by his only friend, Frank (Zach Braff). But, when a twister of epic proportions carries young Oz to the land of Oz, his journey to become the person he really wants to be begins—all the while tempted by witches Theodora and Evanora (Mila Kunis and Rachel Weisz). Will the magic of Glinda the Good Witch (Michelle Williams) be enough to steer him in the right direction?ozgreatandpowerful-thirdposter-full Directed by Sam Raimi, the magical trip to Oz is sure to delight audiences of all ages, giving a fitting back story to the beloved film “The Wizard of Oz,” with plenty of homage moments. Acting from the ensemble feels right, peppered humor comes across in just the right doses, and Danny Elfman’s score is the perfect touch without going overboard. Taking full advantage of 3D, Raimi is still up to his usual and innovative cinema exploitation. The only drawback, we’ve seen better computer graphics as of late, but still, it’s the story, it’s the fun, it’s the magic, it’s Oz the Great and Powerful!! Totally worthy and rated PG.

Comments Off on Oz the Great and Powerful
8th March
2013
written by Adam

At the conclusion of World War II, the political climate of Japan was incredibly tense and tenuous. General MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) was tasked with investigating the remaining political players of Japan, and finding who specifically was guilty of war crimes; of particular interest was Emperor Hirohito (Takataro Kataoka). Turning to his top advisors MacArthur set General Bonner Fellers (Matthew Fox) on the difficult task of getting to Hirohito and the even more difficult task getting him to talk. All the while Fellers has a quiet agenda of his own, lost love.Carlost.net Saving a country and finding love, not light topics, yet inspired by true events. Director Peter Webber carefully captures Japan’s darkest hours in what appears to be historically accurate detail. While not the flashiest tale ever told, the historical lessons depicted are still just as valid today as they were then. Not exactly a stretch for any of the principle actors involved, the casting seems to fit nicely, although a wooden appearance from Fox sometimes feels a bit off point. Worthy of your time. Perhaps a matinee if you’re looking for a WWII historical docudrama that won’t challenge you, but rather amaze you as to how easily Japan’s history could have been written otherwise. Emperor is rated PG-13.

Comments Off on Emperor

BLOGROLL

META

ARCHIVE