Archive for April 5th, 2013

5th April
2013
written by Adam

Working as a motorcycle stunt rider in a traveling circus, Luke (Ryan Gosling), finds the love of his life, Romina (Eva Mendes), in the small community of Schenectady, New York. Attracted by his mysterious nature the two hit it off; however, despite his best intentions Luke doesn’t quite know how to function as an upright standing citizen and leaves Romina pregnant. Returning a year later with new priorities Luke aims to settle in with Romina and the son he hasn’t met yet. Unsure of how to help, Luke and his friend Robin (Ben Mendelsohn) turn to robbing banks to get cash, money to provide for Romina and son. Digging himself in deeper and deeper eventually the law, specifically, officer Avery (Bradley Cooper) catches up with Luke. Connected by fate the impact Luke and Avery have on each other will span generations. Meanwhile, honesty and integrity is questioned in the Schenectady police department, at the center of the mess is Detective Deluca (Ray Liotta). Washing one’s self of one’s sins and attempting to provide a clean start for their sons and families, how to provide the best for their loved ones, and how to deal with their own errors is at the core of this difficult drama.the-place-beyond-the-pines-poster Directed by Derek Cianfrance and co-written by Cianfrance, Ben Coccio, and Darius Marader, The Place Beyond the Pines illustrates Cianfrance’s continued growth and development as a director of honest and gritty storytelling, examining human nature, and real people in real situations. In a recent interview with Cianfrance I had a chance to discuss the writing process, a five year project that began in 2007. From the outset several ideas were apparent: writingprocess
From these ideas and 30+ revisions the film that became “Pines” as Cianfrance affectionately calls it was born. Masterful acting from the ensemble breathes life into all of the characters further, including notable performances from Rose Byrne, Emory Cohen, and Dane DeHaan. Lending to the feel of the film was the fact that the film was indeed shot on 35mm film, discussing the importance of film over digital media Cianfrance had this to say: Derekonfilm
To round things out the film contains a haunting score, designed in part by alternative vocal gymnast and experimental musical genius Mike Patton (Faith No More, Mr. Bungle, Fantomas, Tomahawk), how the marriage of Pines and Patton came to be Cianfrance explains: onPatton
Cinefiles take note, this is one to pay attention to, it’s imperfections are easily overlooked while it’s distinct independent feel will seduce. This one’s about quality film making. Worth it, The Place Beyond the Pines is rated R.

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5th April
2013
written by Adam

In an effort to help a childhood friend stay clean from a life of drugs, four friends, David, Eric, Olivia, and Natalie (Shiloh Fernandez, Lou Taylor Pucci, Jessica Lucas, Elizabeth Blackmore), make a pact to retain Mia (Jane Levy) at a remote family cabin for several days to dry things out. But, when an ancient book of the dead is discovered in the basement, the group unknowingly summons an evil presence back to the cabin. Now it’s a matter of surviving the night lest they all be dead by dawn!evil_dead First things first, if you’re not already familiar with the original Evil Dead from 1981 and it’s remake Evil Dead II from 1987 there’s a good chance you’ll be missing out on some of the humor, the call backs, and the fun that the franchise has brought forth so far to achieve cult status; it’s high time you educate yourself. That being said, and as with any re-make, this latest incarnation of Evil Dead is in danger of disappointing it’s core audience– fortunately, it will not. By putting together a reworked script that adds actual depth and character development, what was once absurd and goofy now carries some weight and actually makes sense. Going further, the acting isn’t half bad and there’s some empathy generated for each of the characters as their fate is called. Writer/Director Fede Alvarez and writer Diablo Cody have given sufficient backbone to what might have otherwise been quite thin. What is missing here is some of the campiness of the originals, but that’s not to say the film is void of humor, there are after all plenty of gallows-esque humor points throughout. Even more impressive is the makeup/prosthetics and the cinematography, both are notable and respectable in their own right, often leaving incredibly visceral and indelible afterthoughts. Appropriate scoring adds the extra edge to sell things further, and semi-ironic use of an air raid siren somehow seems to fit right in. Enough to leave you squirming in your seat several times over, mission accomplished. Remember to sit through the credits, extra fun ensues. Worth it. Evil Dead is miraculously only rated R.

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