Archive for April 12th, 2013

12th April
2013
written by Adam

A forty something slacker named David (Patrick Huard) finally seems to be getting his act together. A fortuitous effort considering the fact that his semi-girlfriend, Valerie (Julie LeBreton), has just discovered she is pregnant with his child. But life is about to get interesting as David finds out that years earlier his sperm was given to over 500 women at a fertility clinic. Making matters more difficult, approximately 142 of his genetic children now want to know their father. To remain anonymous or come forward is a tough decision and could have a serious impact on his future with Valerie. Helping to guide, David’s best friend (Antoine Bertrand), serves as a lawyer and conscience. Alas, David is a passionate man and leads with his heart, how can this possibly work out?starbuck_xlg Quirky and fun, Director Ken Scott certainly has the mind for a creative and new story; and, despite the language barrier (the film is in French/Canadian with subtitles), he and co-writer Martin Petit have come up with a dramatic comedy that crosses borders. With European sensibilities and honest performances Starbuck was one of SIFF’s 2012 gems now getting its own release here in Seattle. Touching, thought provoking, and inspiring the film tugs heart strings you didn’t know you had and will still leave you with that “just right” feel good sense. Worth your while. Starbuck is rated R.

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12th April
2013
written by Adam

Simon (James McAvoy) is a fine arts auctioneer caught up with thousands of dollars of gambling debt and debt collectors getting closer every day. In order to pay off his ledger Simon teams up with Franck (Vincent Cassel), a hardened criminal mastermind, and a ringleader of a small crime circuit. With Franck’s help a scheme to steal a painting worth millions is cooked up, but there’s a problem. The painting is lost once it is stolen and having suffered a severe head injury Simon can’t recall where the painting has been stowed. To grease the gears and help him “remember” a hypnotherapist, Elizabeth (Rosario Dawson), is hired to facilitate the situation. But when Simon’s subconscious revolts, further plodding into the psyche of a tormented soul must commence, but to what end? Trance-movie-poster Directed by Danny Boyle and written by Joe Ahearne and John Hodge, this vivid exploration of the mind and our perceptions is told in only a way that Boyle seems capable of; creative cinematography with raked angles and a wash of rich colors making for a visually stunning and beautiful composition. Acting from the ensemble is no small thing either, all strong performers, each showing range and depth to keep the viewer engaged. The weakness? a screenplay that eventually winds up a little too plotted and contrived, but this is almost forgivable as the rest of the film steamrolls along to it’s poignant end. Also, as with other Boyle films, song and music selection is key to the visuals, again, winners are chosen. Totally fun, totally worth it. Trance is rated R.

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12th April
2013
written by Adam

Connected by technology, cell phones, computers, the internet, the human race has never had it so easy to just reach out and touch each other; yet, somehow, could it be all this technology is actually driving us further apart? This is the study of several families and individuals, how their actions and reactions will impact each other, and how our own intelligence may actually be our own undoing, prompting the need to disconnect. Perhaps for some it may already be too late.Disconnect-poster Written by Andrew Stern and Directed by Henry Alex Rubin, Disconnect’s quasi-satirical, pessimistic but also honest outlook serves as a poke in the eye to all of us slaves to Facebook/texting/tweeting/instant messaging and so on. This all in order to show that it’s not the technology we need, but rather each other, a message that starts out quiet enough but comes on heavy handed as we enter the final act of the film. And, a screenplay that’s perhaps a little too convenient in it’s weavings of narrative, still, interesting in concept. Acting from the ensemble feels well developed and true, and the work from Jason Bateman, Hope Davis, Frank Grillo, Paula Patton, Andrea Riseborough, Alexander SkarsgĂ„rd, Max Thieriot and Jonah Bobo all pays off in the end. A good conversation starter for families and friends alike. Worth it. Disconnect is rated R.

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