Archive for January, 2018

12th January
2018
written by Adam

A few years after WWII fashion designer Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), a man who is loved and feared by many in the industry takes a profound interest in a waitress named Alma (Vicky Krieps). Alma becomes Reynolds lover, muse, and eventually wife, and, aside from his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville), she appears to be one of the only women who really understands and can possibly tame him. A tangled mess of neurosis, hubris, and arrogance, with a dash of food poisoning to bring a couple together, but can it also tear things apart?Written and Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, this uneasy examination of a wildly passionate artist being matched by an equally talented spark serves as the carrier to what is being touted as Daniel Day-Lewis’s final performance; a performance that is not necessarily his most dynamic but perhaps his most controlled and metered performance, with great power comes great control. Larger than Day-Lewis though it’s Krieps delicate, detailed, and inspired performance that truly shines. Paired with scoring from Johnny Greenwood that melds liquid piano flavors and costume design by Mark Bridges that weaves fine threads into finer gowns Phantom Thread stands as a definite art piece which may thematically prove hard for conventional audiences; but, for the cinephiles, more satisfying. Worthy of your cinema dollar, Phantom Thread is rated R.

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5th January
2018
written by Adam

With tragic losses being measured in Vietnam a U.S. government cover-up is discovered by a team of journalists in need of a big break. Lead by a hard driving editor (Tom Hanks) and the country’s first female newspaper publisher (Meryl Streep), The Post finds itself embroiled in an unprecedented battle between the free press and the government. Will four presidents of cover-up ever come to light or be buried for eternity? Directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Liz Hannah and Josh Singer, this potentially droll governmental procedural turns against the expected in ways that only a master story teller such as Spielberg can conjure to make for a riveting and thrilling romp down memory lane of the late 60’s and early 70’s. Teamed with composer John Williams and cinematographer Janusz Kaminsky, regulars in the tool chest of Spielberg, The Post contains all the Hallmarks one expects with a dash of schmaltz to make for a hybrid of Spotlight (2015) and Hidden Figures (2016) (not bad company mind you) creating the feel good piece reflective of what America needs right now, which also prompts the question, “what cover-up story from today will we be telling in another 40 years?” Regardless, this ensemble piece has solid pedigree through and through and is poised for high praise, even if it tries a little too hard at times. Worth your time, The Post is rated PG-13.

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5th January
2018
written by Adam

Supernaturalist and Parapsychologist Dr. Elise Rainier (Lin Shaye) is called back to her childhood house in Five Keys New Mexico on the request of the new homeowner, Ted (Kirk Acevedo). Tormented by the multiple spirits in the house Ted is looking for any help he can get, but, returning to the house for Elise will mean re-opening old wounds, re-discovering her past, and digging deeper into her abilities than ever expected. Can life be set straight in this house of horrors? Directed by Adam Robitel and Written by Leigh Whannell, the now established formula to this dark ride franchise continues to jump through the same expected hoops offering sufficient pulp but little overall sustenance for a healthy horror diet. Offerings of telegraphed jump scares and the now standard dark framings deliver cheap thrills up front but leave audiences wanting more meat on the bone for a truly terrorizing experience; it is evident that quite a bit of developmental material has been cut from the final print leaving a few questions along the way, with a runtime a few ticks shy of two hours one supposes darlings had to be killed, so it goes. Certainly not the top of the Insidious pile, but not the bottom either, Insidious: The Last Key is rated PG-13.

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