Archive for December, 2021

24th December
2021
written by Adam

Burned out in tinseltown, adult film star Mikey Saber (Simon Rex) returns to his small Texas hometown to re-group his energy, but as it turns out, nobody seems to want him around….except perhaps the young and impressionable Strawberry (Suzanna Son). Written by Sean Baker and Chris Bergoch and Directed by Baker, this beautiful train wreck of a story starts off with a sharp tongue, quick wit, honest acting and cringeworthy outcomes, a pace that’s hard to maintain the entire runtime of two hours and eight minutes, and, admittedly does run a bit gassed by it’s conclusion; however, there’s a lot to appreciate along the way in terms of heartfelt schadenfreude within a dark comedy of errors. And, while not as avant garde as say, Harmony Korine, Director Sean Baker definitely sits as a shelf mate, creating beauty from the appalling with an eye for color and a palate made of the modern-absurd. Looking to feel uncomfortable and laugh at the same time, this might just be your ticket. Red Rocket is rated R.

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23rd December
2021
written by Adam

In the 1980′ Naples, a young Fabietto (Filippo Scotti) is shaped by his experiences, sports, family, pop culture, and the general awkwardness of teen hormones, a combination that could propel him forward to pursue a career in cinema, if he had a just had a story to tell, then again, maybe he does. Written and Directed by Paolo Sorrentino this deeply personal story is told through stunning cinematography yet angular and indirect plot lines, sketching out a story similar to a Picasso painting, an implied meaning that one understands by looking at the total piece but not by studying its individual parts; for this reason, this semi avant garde storytelling approach probably won’t sit well with mass audiences, however, those up for a slow burn will definitely have something memorable to discuss later. The Hand of God is rated R.

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23rd December
2021
written by Adam

Growing up on Long Island without a father present might have had detrimental impacts for Jr (Daniel Renieri/Tye Sheridan); but with his Uncle Charlie (Ben Affleck) and the barflies that frequent the Dickens Pub imparting their wisdom, with a little luck and a lot of hope Jr might just turn out okay. Based on the book written by J.R. Moehringer and screenplay by William Monahan, Directed by George Clooney this measured pace homecoming/coming of age tale rolls out slowly, avoiding extremes and staying safely in the shallower end of the pool. And, while the story itself does show the traditional hero’s quest, an attainment of knowledge or the “golden fleece” as it were, the overall journey doesn’t push forward in a memorable and meaningful way. End result, all parties get an A for effort, but an “eh?” for entertainment value. The Tender bar is rated R.

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