Main image
30th November
2018
written by Adam

It’s Christmas time in the small town of Little Haven, the trees are frocked, the tinsel is tinseling, and the dead are walking…Wait, what? That’s right, it’s a zombie apocalypse, and, young Anna (Ella Hunt) and her friends find themselves in the unfortunate position of slaying, braining, mauling, and goring the ensuing onslaught of undead all the while performing to the aesthetic of a High School musical. Let the feast begin. Written by Alan McDonald and Ryan McHenry, and Directed by John McPhail, this nutty Scottish work has a certain, don’t blink or you’ll miss it quality, combining simple zombie tropes with solid song writing to make for a breezy send up of the standard horror genre. With a clearly talented young ensemble, all parts seem in place for a new bloody spot next to your elf on a shelf. Nit picking, the makeup and FX aren’t top tier, but the sheer amount of spatter and splatter balanced with quippy one liners is enough to keep the cursory zombie fan enthused; and, clocking in with a swift 97 minute runtime, welcomes are clearly not overstayed. Quick down and dirty, it’s escapism for the holidays, although, a bit dated for the Glee and Zombie craze, relax, it’s okay to just have fun. Anna and the Apocalypse is rated R.

Comments Off on Anna and the Apocalypse
21st November
2018
written by Adam

It’s been thirty years since Apollo Creed was killed in the boxing ring by Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren). And now, with the ascent of Adonis Creed (Michael B. Jordan) to the position of the light heavyweight champion of the world Ivan is back on the boxing scene as well, this time as the coach of his own son, Viktor (Florian Munteanu). It’ll take the words and wisdom of Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) to condition young Adonis into the fighter he’ll need to be to maintain his title. But to achieve great success will also take great risk, in this case the possibility of death. Will Adonis find his mojo before he finds his fate, and what about the love of his fiance, Bianca (Tessa Thompson), and mother (Phylicia Rashad)? Directed by Steven Caple Jr. and Written by Cheo Hodari Coker this repeating of fictional boxing history makes for a poetic concept but ultimately fails to land all of its punches in comparison to its predecessor Creed (2015). Specifically lacking this round, intimacy within the ring, the absence of Cinematographer Maryse Alberti is felt in each action sequence with a lack of finesse to the overall choreography and scope, sigh. But, let’s be quick to point out, the punches that do land are massive body blows, and, even if the entire script is telegraphed from frame one, there’s still something inherently inspiring about the re-telling of an old legend in new form handing off the baton one more time. Ensemble wise, all players are on key and on point, success continues. Perhaps a matinee for your Thanksgiving weekend? Creed II is rated PG-13.

Comments Off on Creed II
21st November
2018
written by Adam

Based on true events it’s the early 60’s and working class tough guy, bouncer, and fixer Tony Lip (Viggo Mortensen) is a man looking to support his family for a few months while his main gig is rebuilding; reluctantly, he jumps at the opportunity to make a few dollars by being the private driver for Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), a classically trained world class pianist booked on a tour of the deep South who happens to be African American. Needless to say, tensions will be running high at multiple ports of call, but the lessons and wisdom both can pass to each other will hold more value than any concert hall can hold. Directed by Peter Farrelly and written by Nick Vallelonga, Brian Hayes Currie, and Peter Farrelly, this feel good film for the 2018 awards season conjures up memories of Miss Daisy and checks all of the requisite boxes for a balanced and wholesome day at the movies with two potential awards nominees. Sure there’s a fair amount of pandering towards the final act of the film, but the general sentiment is still solid despite the spoonfuls of sugar audiences are being asked to consume, syrup anyone? Meanwhile, clocking in at 2 hours and ten minutes of run time it’s hard to say what could have been let go, but certainly, a more judicious knife could have tightened things up a further, so it goes. Still, an entertaining and interesting mirror to our current political climate. Green Book is rated PG-13.

Comments Off on Green Book
Previous

BLOGROLL

META

ARCHIVE