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20th October
2017
written by Adam

Shellshocked, author Alan A. Milne (Domhnall Gleeson) returns home to his wife Daphne (Margot Robbie) after World War I; upon the birth of their son, Christopher Robin (Will Tilston, Alex Lawther), Milne would focus his talents towards the creation of the beloved stories of Winnie the Pooh, a well intended outlet with unexpected consequences. In the wings, nanny Olive (Kelly MacDonald) looks on with regret as the child she helped raise slowly loses his place in world. With a new terror rising in Germany the inner workings of the Milne family are up for examination. Directed by Simon Curtis and written by Frank Cottrell Boyce and Simon Vaughn this biopic look at the Milne family continues the recent trend of panning for gold from compelling but less identified figures in history coming up with a sizable nugget. Showcasing the strengths of the ensemble there doesn’t appear to be a note out of tune, although, a truncated act three does seem to condense a large portion of history; none the less, rolling in just under two hours of runtime Christopher Robin doesn’t overstay his welcome and accomplishes what’s necessary, the telling of an interesting story in a reasonably straightforward yet interesting way. Matinee worthy, Goodbye Christopher Robin is rated PG.

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13th October
2017
written by Adam

In the 1930’s and 40’s professor William Marston (Luke Evans), his brilliant wife Elizabeth (Rebecca Hall) and their mistress Olive (Bella Heathcoste) would lay the groundwork supported by psychological theory for the most successful female superhero to date, Wonder Woman, this is their story. Written and Directed by Angela Robinson this simple yet compelling story of the complexities behind Wonder Woman, the personalities that helped shape her character, and the unconventional relationship that to this day would raise more than a few eyebrows offers great insight into our nation’s psyche then and now. Balanced and delicate portrayals from the ensemble go further to offer intelligent conversation fodder on human sexuality, eroticism, feminism, and women’s rights. While not necessarily a feel good film through and through and steering clear of a large portion of melodrama the overall story and its historical significance, especially in the 21st century where many of the same themes are still alive today, makes for a scholarly view to our apparent failure to learn from our past mistakes. There’s a lot to like here, worthy of your matinee dollar, Professor Marston and the Wonder Women is rated R.

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6th October
2017
written by Adam

In the year 2049 an agent with the LAPD, K (Ryan Gosling), is tasked with tracking down and “retiring” old rogue models of Replicants, humanoid slave bots. But, when a long buried secret is unearthed on the job, K finds himself thrust into a much larger pinwheel of chaos– a battle that could blow society to shambles. Directed by Denis Villeneuve with cinematography by Roger Deakins and scoring by Hans Zimmer and Benjamin Wallfisch the collective powerhouse of sheer talent involved in this film is already only available in prescription strength; but, coupled with a well thought out screenplay by Hampton Fancher and Michael Green, the 30 year wait for a followup to the original Blade Runner is quickly paid off. A full sensory overload and thoughtful experience, Villeneuve hypnotically takes the time to develop rich themes from Philip K. Dick’s original source material to the point audiences may not even notice the runtime of two hours and forty three minutes (to that point skip the 32oz soda before the show). Meanwhile the acting prowess by the entire ensemble sits on top of the pile as we quickly finish out the rest of this year. Blade Runner 2049 serves as a great reminder that well done Sci-Fi films have the potential to change the way we see our own world. Picking out the heavy weights for the weekend, you’re picking out Blade Runner 2049, rated R.

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